Saturday, November 19, 2011

Embroidery. Why not?



Picked all this up at Hobby Lobby today for only $7. I thought it would be a fun little project to do while I'm home for Thanksgiving break. I'm thinking a paisley or maybe a floral design. I've only ever attempted the cross stitch kits and never done any true embroidery. I was thinking of using osnaburg for the fabric. Any reason why that wouldn't be a good idea? And do I need to use interfacing too? Clearly, I'm totally clueless when it comes to this. 

Do you have any favorite patterns, or maybe a good blog with embroidery tutorials? Please send 'em my way! I can use all the help I can get. 

Thanks!

17 comments:

Mary said...

http://wildolive.blogspot.com/

She has some great tutorials and beginner stuff! Can't wait to see what you make!

Allie said...

Embroidery really is so fun. and relaxing really. i love Wild Olive like the Mary said and I also just found this site and it has so many stitch tutorials! http://www.embroidery.rocksea.org/

Abby said...

Check this site out, too! http://www.needlenthread.com/2009/10/hand-embroidery-lettering-and-text.html
I'm new to this also and starting my first real project. I've done a basic back stitch, but that's about it! Can't wait to see what you come up with. By the way, I've used quilting cottons for my little embroidered labels and it's great. No interfacing necessary. I think it's used in machine embroidery to stabilize the fabric.

Katy said...

Thanks so much ladies. These sites are fantastic!

xchocoxloverx said...

Just make friendship bracelets! Embroidery thread is the best for making them, and there are soooo many kinds to make!

Amy said...

http://zuill.us/andreablog/2009/06/05/junes-free-pattern/

This owl is super cute. I have one hanging on my wall. There are lots of free embroidery patterns out there!
Wild olive is great too, I love her stuff!

Kimberly said...

I also really like this guest post on Alisa Burke's blog.
http://alisaburke.blogspot.com/2011/10/guest-post-hand-stitching-journal-pages.html
It makes me want to scrap my current project and makes something much more dimensional and crazy. :)

Charis said...

Hey, just found your blog on pinterest- it looks super cool! Embroidery is really fun, albeit time consuming. I'm not familiar with osnaburg, but embroidery will work on any fabric that is relatively heavy and holds its own shape pretty well. No interfasing required either. It also works best with fabrics that are pretty loose-woven, although I've worked with other stuff before.

I've done embroidery several ways- one of the easiest was to draw or print the design right on the fabric and then simply cover it with the thread.

Have fun!!

Happy in red said...

Oooh a plunge into the depth ;-) Am very curious what will be the result. Keep us posted ;-)
Have fun on your break!
Esther.

Kelli said...

I do use a little bit of interfacing when I embroider if the fabric is thin. For my last sampler (my first embroidery in years!!) I used muslin, so I did put a piece of interfacing behind it to give the muslin some sturdiness.
Also, welovefrenchknots.com is a great new site for instructions, free patterns and links to great designers.

Monkey said...

check out urbanthreads.com it's got a lot of cool designs that are both for hand embroidery and machine embroidery... they also do a lot of cool tutorials

Rebecca @ My Girlish Whims said...

i just learned how to embroider this semester! I've really enjoyed it! a paisley design sounds really cute! I should try that the next meeting of my embroidery club, and yes I do actually go an embroidery club :)

Alayna said...

I love hand embroidery! I love all the different designs and stitches you can use to make the perfect piece. I just started to learn hand embroidery myself and I find it very relaxing!
:)

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Steph Almasy said...

Jenny from SublimeStitching.com is fantastic! She has great tutorials and funky patterns. Her slogan is "this ain't your granmma's embroidery."
UrbanThreads.com is good too.

Elizabeth Braun said...

You're welcome to visit my blog where I have one or tutorials.=)

http://sew-in-love.blogspot.com/

nahidworld said...

Embroidery is a decorative art form which uses outline and filling stitches to create thread or yarn designs on fabric. Chain stitch, running stitch, blanket stitch, cross stitch and satin stitch have been used for embroidery throughout history. Today, we have sewing machines that are specially made to mimic the outline and filling stitches used in traditional hand embroidery.

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